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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

AP probe: Sex abuse pervasive in Pakistan Islamic schools

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An Associated Press investigation has found that sexual abuse is pervasive at Islamic schools in Pakistan.

But in a culture where clerics are powerful and sexual abuse is a taboo subject, it is seldom discussed or even acknowledged in public. It is even more seldom prosecuted. Police are often paid off not to pursue justice against clerics, victims’ families say. And cases rarely make it past the courts, which allow the victim’s family to “forgive” the offender.

The AP found hundreds of cases of sexual abuse reported over the past decade, and officials suspect there are thousands more. About 22,000 madrassas are registered in Pakistan, and thousands more are unregistered. The madrassa system teaches about 2 million children.

Impeachment of Zimbabwe's Mugabe set to begin

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Zimbabwe’s ruling party is set to begin impeachment proceedings against longtime President Robert Mugabe, while a party official says government ministers have been instructed to boycott a Cabinet meeting called by the president.

Ruling party chief whip Lovemore Matuke tells The Associated Press minutes before the Cabinet meeting is expected to start that ministers have been told to instead attend a meeting at party headquarters to work on the impeachment. Parliament resumes Tuesday.

Mugabe’s chief secretary on Monday summoned ministers to the Cabinet meeting at State House, the president’s official residence.

Mugabe is finding himself increasingly isolated.

The military on Monday night said the vice president he recently fired, sparking the political turmoil, will return to Zimbabwe “shortly” and has made contact with Mugabe.

Police: Woman confessed to putting babies in concrete in 90s

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Japanese police say a woman went to a police station and confessed to putting four newborns in concrete-filled buckets two decades ago and having been filled with guilt over not caring for the babies.

Police said 53-year-old Mayumi Saito was arrested Tuesday on charges of abandoning bodies, a day after she turned herself in at an Osaka police station. The official said human bones were identified in buckets found in her condominium.

The police official requested anonymity due to department policy.

Saito was quoted by police as saying she put the bodies into concrete from 1992 through 1997 because she had been too poor to raise them, but she had been filled with guilt.

Saito had a part-time job, but details of her work and family were not available.

Russian state TV: Assad travels to Russia, meets with Putin

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Russian state TV is reporting that Vladimir Putin has met with Syrian President Bashar Assad in Sochi.

The report said the two leaders held bilateral talks on Monday and then met with Russian military chiefs.

It was the second time Assad has traveled to Russia to meet with Putin in the course of the country’s six-year civil war.

The first was in October 2015, shortly after Russia launched its military campaign in Syria to shore up Assad’s forces. The Russian intervention has turned the war in favor of Assad.

The meeting in Sochi comes a week before U.N.-sponsored peace talks are to resume in Geneva.

Assad’s office confirmed the visit on its Facebook page.

AP source: Authorities believe border agent may have fallen

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A U.S. official with knowledge of the investigation into the death of a border patrol agent in South Texas says the surviving agent who radioed for help doesn’t remember what happened.

The official, who was briefed on the investigation but is not authorized to speak publicly and spoke on the condition of anonymity, said Monday that investigators believe agent Rogelio Martinez may have fallen into a 14-foot culvert. Martinez died early Sunday.

The FBI says autopsy results are pending. Martinez’s partner remains hospitalized.

The official says the incident occurred after dark in an area that’s known for drug activity and where agents often look for drugs in culverts.

In a statement Monday, FBI spokeswoman Jeanette Harper says both agents had traumatic head injuries after being found in a culvert near Van Horn, Texas.

Canada, Mexico to rebuff U.S. over NAFTA goals as talks bog down

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Canada and Mexico will rebuff the United States over its demand for tougher NAFTA automotive content rules, top officials said on Monday as negotiations to renew the treaty bogged down with only a few months to go.

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U.S. President Donald Trump is threatening to quit NAFTA, which has reshaped the continent’s auto sector over the past 23 years, unless major changes can be made to return manufacturing jobs to the United States.

Canadian and Mexican negotiators will address the U.S. auto demands on Tuesday, the final day of the fifth round of talks to update the North American Free Trade Agreement, chief Mexican negotiator Ken Smith told reporters.

Although the talks are due to wrap up in March 2018 after a seventh and final round, they are deadlocked over a series of hard-line proposals the United States unveiled at the fourth round last month.

“It’s definitely slowed down from the previous round,” said a Canadian source with direct knowledge of the talks. “There has been no progress in the contentious chapters.”

Canadian and Mexican officials have complained repeatedly about what they see as U.S. inflexibility. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Trade Representative declined to comment.

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Negotiators say they need to finish their work before campaigning for Mexico’s presidential election formally begins at the end of March.

The campaign team for the leftist former mayor of Mexico City and early front-runner, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, on Monday repeated calls for the NAFTA talks to be postponed until after the July presidential vote.

The Canadian source said the sixth round would be held in Montreal at the end of January 2018.

Mexico and Canada fear Trump will follow through on a promise to pull out of NAFTA, causing disruption and economic damage. The Canadian dollar edged lower against its U.S. counterpart on Monday, in part because of concerns about the negotiations.

Alarmed U.S. politicians and industry groups have started to put concerted pressure on the White House not to take drastic moves they say would cause job losses.

“Support for NAFTA from the American private sector, and also members of Congress, and even Republican governors, is starting to get very vocal, which we view very positively,” said Moises Kalach, head of the international negotiating arm of Mexico’s CCE business lobby.

Jeff Leal, farm minister for the powerful Canadian province of Ontario, said in an interview he believed the increasingly vocal U.S. protests would help those who wanted to keep NAFTA.

FRICTION OVER AUTO CONTENT STANDARDS

Canada and Mexico are particularly unhappy about the U.S. push for tougher autos content. Vehicles and auto parts account for most of the $64 billion U.S. trade deficit with Mexico, a sore spot for Trump.

The Trump administration wants half of the content of all North American-built autos be produced in the United States and that the regional vehicle content requirement be increased to 85 percent from 62.5 percent.

Canada and Mexico dismiss the idea as unworkable and plan to respond with presentations on how such a move would damage the North American auto industry, people briefed on the talks said.

A Mexican auto industry representative with knowledge of the talks called the U.S. proposal “insane” on Sunday.

“There is no product made in North America that meets this rule of origin requirement,” said Matt Blunt, president of the American Automotive Policy Council, which represents Ford Motor Co <F. N>, General Motors Co and Fiat Chrysler.

In San Antonio, Texas, a senior U.S. official told a Senate panel that the administration wanted to rebalance the large automotive trade deficit with Mexico.

(Additional reporting by David Ljunggren, David Lawder, Dave Graham and Anthony Esposito in Mexico City and Fergal Smith in Toronto; Writing by David Lawder and David Ljunggren; Editing by Cynthia Osterman and Lisa Von Ahn)

Search intensifies for Argentina&#039;s sub with 44 crew members as oxygen supply may be running low

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A multinational search intensified on Tuesday for Argentina’s missing submarine with 44 crew members off the country’s coast as the clock may be ticking on the crew’s oxygen supply.

The German-built San Juan submarine has been missing since Wednesday when it reported a battery failure and lost contact with the Argentine Navy. Two Argentine navy ships detected signals day ago from about 220 miles off the coast at a depth of 650 feet, but the source of the signals could not be determined, the BBC reported.  

“Some sources were saying that this was banging on the hull in Morse code signals,” Enrique Balbi, a navy spokesman, said. He said the sources could not be verified.

The submarine reportedly carried enough food, oxygen and fuel for the crew to survive about 90 days on the sea’s surface, but only enough oxygen to last seven days underwater, he said.

The submarine was originally scheduled to arrive Sunday in Mar del Plata, a navy base about 250 miles southeast of Buenos Aires.

A U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon aircraft assisted in the search efforts by deploying its first aircraft on November 18 and a second ship with special tracking equipment and deep-sea rescue modules on November 20, the US Air Force stated.

Argentine President Mauricio Macri met with family members at the base as they waited for news about their loved ones. Concerned family members have taken to social media to plead for help in the search process.  

“Pray so that my husband, Fernando Santilli can return home,” Jessica Gopar wrote on Twitter. “He’s in the San Juan submarine.

More than a dozen international vessels and aircraft have joined the search for the missing submarine, which has been set back by stormy weather that has caused waves up to 20 feet.  Eleven boats and 10 planes from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, South Africa, Uruguay, and the UK were assisting in the search as well, Balbi said. 

Search intensifies for Argentina&#039;s sub with 44 crew members as oxygen supply runs low

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A multinational search intensified on Tuesday for Argentina’s missing submarine with 44 crew members off the country’s coast as the clock ticked on the crew’s oxygen supply.

The German-built San Juan submarine has been missing since Wednesday when it reported a battery failure and lost contact with the Argentine Navy. Two Argentine navy ships detected signals day ago from about 220 miles off the coast at a depth of 650 feet, but the source of the signals could not be determined, the BBC reported.  

“Some sources were saying that this was banging on the hull in Morse code signals,” Enrique Balbi, a navy spokesman, said. He said the sources could not be verified.

The submarine reportedly carried enough food, oxygen and fuel for the crew to survive about 90 days on the sea’s surface, but only enough oxygen to last seven days underwater, he said.

The submarine was originally scheduled to arrive Sunday in Mar del Plata, a navy base about 250 miles southeast of Buenos Aires.

A U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon aircraft assisted in the search efforts by deploying its first aircraft on November 18 and a second ship with special tracking equipment and deep-sea rescue modules on November 20, the US Air Force stated.

Argentine President Mauricio Macri met with family members at the base as they waited for news about their loved ones. Concerned family members have taken to social media to plead for help in the search process.  

“Pray so that my husband, Fernando Santilli can return home,” Jessica Gopar wrote on Twitter. “He’s in the San Juan submarine.

More than a dozen international vessels and aircraft have joined the search for the missing submarine, which has been set back by stormy weather that has caused waves up to 20 feet.  Eleven boats and 10 planes from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, South Africa, Uruguay, and the UK were assisting in the search as well, Balbi said. 

His country a smoldering ruin, but Assad still in his seat

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Syrians are getting ready for a new round of diplomacy intended to forge a path forward for a political transition in the country after six years of war.

As the sides prepare for what will be the eighth round of U.N.-sponsored peace talks in Geneva later this month, one thing is clear and that is that President Bashar Assad has survived the war.

One reason is military. Assad’s forces have had the momentum on the ground the past year, backed by an overwhelming Russian air campaign and fighters from Iran and Hezbollah. Assad’s government now controls more than 50 percent of Syria.

Holding half the country normally wouldn’t be an optimistic sign, but that’s up from 19 percent earlier this year. His troops control Syria’s four largest cities.

Big Tobacco&#039;s anti-smoking ads begin after decade of delay

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Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies return to prime-time television this weekend — but not by choice.

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Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than 11 years after a judge ruled that the companies had misled the public about the dangers of cigarettes.

But years of legal pushback by the industry over every detail means the ads will be less hard-hitting than what was proposed. Tobacco control experts say the campaign — built around network TV and newspapers — will not reach people when they are young and most likely to start smoking.

“Their legal strategy is always obstruct, delay, create confusion and buy more time,” said Ruth Malone, of the University of California, San Francisco, who has studied the industry for 20 years. “So by the time this was finally settled, newspapers have a much smaller readership, and nowadays, who watches network TV?”

The new spots, which begin Sunday, lay out the toll of smoking in blunt text and voiceover statements: “More people die every year from smoking than from murder, AIDS, suicide, drugs, car crashes and alcohol, combined.”

Smoking remains the nation’s leading preventable cause of death and illness, causing more than 480,000 deaths each year, even though smoking rates have been declining for decades. Last year, the adult smoking rate hit a new low of 15 percent, according to government figures. That’s down from the 42 percent of adults who smoked in the mid-1960s.

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Experts attribute the decline to smoking bans, cigarette taxes and anti-smoking campaigns by both nonprofit groups like the American Cancer Society and the federal government.

The new ads are the result of a 1999 lawsuit filed by the Justice Department under President Bill Clinton which sought to recover some of the billions the federal government spent caring for people with smoking-related illnesses.

A federal judge ultimately sided with the government in 2006, ruling that Big Tobacco had “lied, misrepresented and deceived the American public” about the effects of smoking for more than 50 years. The decision came nearly a decade after U.S. states reached legal settlements with the industry worth $246 billion.

But under the racketeering laws used to prosecute the federal case, the judge said she could not make the companies pay, instead ordering them to publish “corrective statements” in advertisements, as well as on their websites, cigarette packs and store displays.

The campaign will be paid for by Altria Group, owner of Philip Morris USA, and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a division of British American Tobacco.

Altria, maker of Marlboros, referred inquiries to a statement it issued last month: “We remain committed to aligning our business practices with society’s expectations of a responsible company. This includes communicating openly about the health effects of our products.”

Reynolds, which sells Camel cigarettes, did not respond to a request for comment.

Originally the U.S. government wanted companies to state that they had lied about smoking risks. But the companies successfully challenged that proposal, arguing that it was “designed solely to shame and humiliate.” An appeals court ruled the ads could only be factual and forward-looking.

Even the phrase “here’s the truth,” was disputed and blocked. “Here’s the truth: Smoking is very addictive. And it’s not easy to quit,” read one proposed message.

“This was a classic case of a very wealthy set of defendants willing to appeal every conceivable issue time and time again,” said Matthew Myers of the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids, one of several anti-tobacco groups who intervened in the court case.

More than half a century ago, American media was saturated with tobacco advertising. Cigarettes were the most advertised product on TV and tobacco companies sponsored hundreds of shows, including “I Love Lucy,” ”The Flintstones” and “Perry Mason.” People smoked almost everywhere, in restaurants, airplanes and doctor’s offices.

Congress banned cigarette advertising from radio and TV in 1970 and subsequent restrictions have barred the industry from billboards and public transportation. Yet companies still spend more than $8 billion annually on marketing, including print advertising, mailed coupons and store displays.

Anti-tobacco advocates estimate the upcoming TV advertisements will cost companies a tiny fraction of that, about $30 million. The broadcast ads will air five times per week for one year and the newspaper ads will run five times over several months in about 50 national daily papers.

Robin Koval, president of Truth Initiative, has seen mock-ups of the TV ads in court and says they are not very engaging.

“It’s black type scrolling on a white screen with the most uninteresting voice in the background,” said Koval, whose group runs educational anti-tobacco ads targeting youngsters.

Nine of 10 smokers begin smoking before age 18, which is why most prevention efforts focus on teenagers. Yet less than 5 percent of today’s network TV viewers are under 25, according to Nielsen TV data cited by Koval’s group. While lawyers were hammering out the details of the TV advertisements, consumers increasingly switched to online social media sites and streaming services like Facebook, YouTube and Netflix.

A former smoker who was shown the mock-up ads called them terrible.

“They weren’t very compelling ads, “said Ellie Mixter-Keller, 62, of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, who smoked a pack a day for 30 years before quitting 12 years ago. “I just don’t know if I would have cared about any of that.”

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Associated Press writer Carrie Antlfinger contributed to this report.

U.S. growth forecasts are on the rise

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Don’t look now, but U.S. growth forecasts are moving higher. That’s helping to support U.S. stocks. 

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Projections for U.S. economic growth from two Federal Reserve banks have risen in recent weeks. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York on Friday forecast that gross domestic product will rise 3.8% in the fourth quarter, up from a forecast of 3.2% a week earlier. 

A separate measure from the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta forecast 3.4% growth last week. Research firm DataTrek noted that the rival forecasts are outpacing projections from human economists, who on average expect 2.7% growth for the quarter. 

Even if the less optimistic Atlanta Fed model is correct, it would be the best quarter for the U.S. economy in more than three years. 

The central banks’ forecasts are derived from statistical models that track incoming economic data, and are used by traders to gauge the health of the economy. 

The estimates have been the subject of some contention as they often offer diverging views on the health of the economy. The recent harmony between the two measures means “economists may have some catching up to do,” according to Nicholas Colas, co-founder of DataTrek. 

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As we noted in our Morning MoneyBeat newsletter Monday, this should be a positive for U.S. stocks. Behind the rising economic growth projections has been better-than-expected data on the U.S. housing market and industrial production. Stronger economic growth has helped fuel the record run for U.S. indexes as companies benefit from stronger demand. 

DataTrek warns there’s still time for the rising growth expectations to reverse. The Commerce Department won’t release its fourth-quarter GDP estimate until early next year, and the Atlanta Fed model is typically most accurate about a month before the quarter ends. 

“There is still time, therefore, for the numbers to slip,” said Mr. Colas. And with stocks already pricing in stronger growth, a string of weak data could put pressure on the rally. 

Aldridge leads Spurs to 20th straight home win over Hawks

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SAN ANTONIO (AP) — LaMarcus Aldridge had 22 points and 11 rebounds, and the San Antonio Spurs held off the Atlanta Hawks 96-85 on Monday night.

Atlanta lost its 20th straight game in San Antonio, a skid spanning 20 years.

Manu Ginobili had 16 points and Danny Green had 14 for the Spurs, who have won four of five. Kyle Anderson added 13 points, 10 assists and six rebounds in his 17th start in place of injured All-Star Kawhi Leonard.

Aldridge powered the Spurs past the pesky Hawks, scoring 12 points with six rebounds in the fourth quarter.

Aldridge saved the ball from going out of bounds after blocking Kent Bazemore’s shot and then raced downcourt for a driving, one-handed dunk that gave San Antonio a 78-71 lead with nine minutes remaining.

Green hit consecutive 3-pointers to stretch the lead to 90-79 with 3 minutes remaining.

The Spurs finished 10 for 31 on 3-pointers.

The Hawks forced seven turnovers in the third quarter to keep the game close, trailing 70-65 entering the fourth.

Reserve forward John Collins led Atlanta with 21 points and Taurean Prince added 18. Former Spurs center Dewayne Dedmon had 11 points, including nine in the opening quarter.

TIP-INS

Hawks: Atlanta’s last victory in San Antonio was Feb. 15, 1997. … Hawks center Miles Plumlee did not play after being listed as probable with a strained right quadriceps. … Atlanta has nine players with one year of NBA experience or less. … The Hawks entered the game third in the league with 9.1 steals per game. They had seven against the Spurs. … Atlanta, which had 21 assists, has at least 20 assists in 13 games this season. … Atlanta coach Mike Budenholzer, a former San Antonio assistant, and Dedmon both received warm ovations during pre-game introductions.

Spurs: San Antonio has already missed 52 games due to injury, including the season-long absences of Leonard and Tony Parker. San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich did not offer a timeline for either to return from quadriceps injuries. … Anderson has scored in double figures in eight of 17 games this season after doing so just four times in 72 games last season. … San Antonio matched a season-low by holding Atlanta to 38 points in the first half. … Spurs and Kings are the only teams with just one player averaging 12-plus points per game.

UP NEXT

Hawks: Host Los Angeles Clippers on Wednesday night in the opener of a four-game home stand.

Spurs: Visit New Orleans on Wednesday night in their first meeting of the season against Anthony Davis and DeMarcus Cousins.

Pelicans rally after Cousins ejection, beat Thunder 114-107

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NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Anthony Davis had 36 points and 15 rebounds, and the New Orleans Pelicans rallied after DeMarcus Cousins’ ejection to beat the Oklahoma City Thunder 114-107 on Monday night.

Cousins had 18 points and nine rebounds before he was called for a flagrant foul on Russell Westbrook with five minutes remaining in the third quarter.

Cousins raised his elbows near Westbrook’s face after grabbing a rebound, and the Thunder guard dropped to the floor holding his head. Westbrook remained in the game and finished with 22 points, 16 rebounds, 12 assists and three steals. However, Westbrook also missed 13 of 19 shots.

New Orleans trailed 76-72 when Cousins was ejected but surged ahead soon after with an 11-3 run during which Jameer Nelson, E’Twaun Moore and Darius Miller each hit 3s, with Nelson’s banking in from near half-court as the shot clock expired.

Jrue Holiday scored 18 points for New Orleans, which snapped a two-game skid.

Paul George hit six 3s en route to 26 points and Carmelo Anthony scored 19 for Oklahoma City, which lost its second straight.

TIP-INS

Thunder: Oklahoma City led by 19 points during the first quarter, when Alex Abrines’ 3 made it 25-6. But the Thunder fell back into a tie early in the second quarter before going back up by eight at halftime after George’s 3 made it 65-57. … The Thunder struggled to convert on Pelicans mistakes, scoring just 16 points off of 19 turnovers. … Steven Adams had 15 points and Jerami Grant 10 points. … Oklahoma City made 11 of 35 3-point attempts.

Pelicans: The 6-foot-4 Moore, normally a reserve shooting guard, started at small forward. After averaging 16.2 points in his previous five games, he finished with 12 points against the Thunder. … Miller also had 11 points for New Orleans, hitting three of four 3-point shots. … Davis had seven turnovers. … New Orleans was 7 of 25 on 3-point attempts.

COUSINS’ EXIT

From video replays displayed on the arena scoreboard, it appeared Cousins made contact with Westbrook, but it was difficult to discern whether contact was made with the Thunder star’s head or shoulder, or whether the impact was significant.

Officials did not eject Cousins from the game until after viewing replays on a TV at the scorers’ table, after which they called a flagrant two.

Hard contact is not required for a flagrant two — only an act deemed “unnecessary and excessive.”

UP NEXT

Thunder: Host Golden State on Wednesday night.

Pelicans: Host the San Antonio Spurs on Wednesday night.

Irving&#039;s 47 lead Celtics past Mavericks in overtime to maintain streak

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DALLAS (AP) — Double-digit deficits are becoming just a minor annoyance to the Boston Celtics as they continue their winning ways.

Kyrie Irving scored 10 of his season-high 47 points in overtime as the Celtics rallied from 13 points down in the fourth quarter to beat the Dallas Mavericks 110-102 on Monday night and extend their winning streak to 16 games.

The winning streak ties the fourth-longest in franchise history, and for the third game in a row, Boston trailed by double digits.

In contrast to recent wins over Golden State and Atlanta, this one required a fourth quarter comeback. For that, the Celtics turned to Irving, who delivered his best performance for his new team after Dallas had taken an 87-74 lead with 7:47 to play.

“For us it’s just about battling back when teams get a comfortable rhythm, whether it’d be in the first half or the second half,” Irving said. “As a group we continue just to stick together throughout anything and everything.”

Irving stole the ball from Dirk Nowitzki and fed Jayson Tatum for an alley-oop lay-up that hung on the rim for a full second before dropping through with 1:01 to play to tie the score at 96.

In the extra period, Irving scored his team’s first six points. Then after Jaylen Brown gave Boston a 104-102 lead with a jumper with 1:39 to play, Irving went to work on Yogi Ferrell, backing him down and drawing contact on a lay-up with 48.5 seconds to play. Though Irving missed the free throw to keep the score 106-102, Dallas never got closer.

“I don’t really see it as a pressure situation,” Irving said of his late-game play. “It’s just like playing basketball, man. It’s just like being in a park 7-7 and game is eight.”

Harrison Barnes scored 31 points and Wesley Matthews had 18 for Dallas, which came back from an early double-digit deficit as the Celtics went cold for much of the second and third quarters. Barnes missed a jumper with less than a second to go in regulation that could have won it for Dallas, which fell to 3-15.

“We just needed to make a couple more plays at key times,” Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle said. “Probably just one more key play in the last minute or minute and a half. That would have been the difference.”

Brown finished with 22 for Boston. He and Irving combined to go 24-for-35 while the rest of the Celtics went 14-for-49.

The Mavericks fell behind by as many as 15 points in the first half, outscoring the Celtics 55-35 over the second and third quarters.

NO MORAL VICTORIES

Similar to recent home games against Cleveland and San Antonio, the Mavericks fought one of the NBA’s best teams until the end, getting their home crowd into it. But the Mavericks have three close losses to show for those efforts and perhaps are unfairly saddled with the league’s worst record.

“At the end of the day, it’s got to show up in wins and losses,” Barnes said. “There are no moral victories around here. Tonight was playing against a great team, and a great opportunity to win here in front of our home fans. We let it slip away.”

TIP-INS

Celtics: Marcus Smart came into the game shooting just 27 percent from the field, worst among NBA players with at least 10 attempts per game. And he shot 3-for-15 Monday as the Mavericks backed off and dared him to shoot. But Smart’s 3 with 1:24 to play in the game put Boston within 96-94. . Boston shot just 10-for-34 over the two middle quarters after building the early lead. … The game was a homecoming for Boston rookie Semi Ojeleye, who played college basketball at SMU in Dallas.

Mavericks: Guard J.J. Barea won the NBA Cares Community Assist Award for October for the relief work he did in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in his native Puerto Rico. He was presented with the award at halftime. Barea has provided more than 100,000 pounds of supplies to the island, and he has raised nearly $750,000 in funds through his own efforts and a YouCaring.com fund drive.

UP NEXT

Celtics: At Miami on Wednesday. The Celtics beat the Heat on October 28 for win number four of their streak.

Mavericks: At Memphis on Wednesday for the team’s third meeting of the season. Each team won at home in a back-to-back series in late October.

Trump crackdown on sanctuary cities permanently blocked by federal judge

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A federal judge in California on Monday permanently blocked President Trump’s executive order to withhold federal funding from sanctuary cities that do not cooperate with U.S. immigration authorities.

U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick ruled that the White House does not have the authority to impose new conditions on spending already approved by Congress.

“The Counties have demonstrated that the Executive Order has caused and will cause them constitutional injuries by violating the separation of powers doctrine and depriving them of their Tenth and Fifth Amendment rights,” the judge wrote in his order.

The latest decision is in line with the argument Orrick made in April that temporarily halted the administration’s attempt to crack down on sanctuary cities, prompting an appeal.

Trump has campaigned on ending sanctuary cities. He issued an executive order that called on cutting federal funds from cities as a penalty for shielding illegal immigrants.

“The District Court exceeded its authority today when it barred the President from instructing his cabinet members to enforce existing law,” a  Department of Justice spokesman said in a statement. “The Justice Department will vindicate the President’s lawful authority to direct the executive branch.”

The judge’s ruling on Monday came after two California counties, San Francisco and Santa Clara, filed lawsuits against the Trump administration.

“President Trump might be able to tweet whatever comes to mind, but he can’t grant himself new authority because he feels like it,” San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera said in a statement, adding that the ruling was “a victory for the American people and the rule of law.”

A DOJ lawyer argued in April that the initiative would only apply to a few federal grants, barely affecting the funding in the two counties that filed the lawsuits.

But the judge disagreed, saying the order was written vaguely and could “reach all federal grants” – potentially leading to cutbacks of millions of dollars to Santa Clara and San Francisco.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Lukas Mikelionis is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @LukasMikelionis.

Wife of Raiders&#039; head coach says Trump&#039;s tweets on NFL makes her regret early support, reports say

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The wife of Raiders head coach took to Twitter Monday to criticize President Trump’s comments on the team’s star Marshawn Lynch who sat during the U.S. national anthem but stood for Mexico’s before Sunday’s game.

Linda Del Rio, the wife of Jack Del Rio, tweeted, “President Trump I voted for you, which I now regret. Football is a powerful platform — here’s the charitable work we did in Mexico City #NFLproud,” The San Francisco Chronicle reported.

Del Rio’s Twitter account appeared to be deactivated early Tuesday morning.

Trump, who has recently avoided tweeting about the NFL, tweeted on Monday that the NFL should suspend Lynch “for the remainder of the season” if he sits out the national anthem again.

Sports Illustrated, reported that Lynch has protested the anthem all season, and has not stood for the anthem since coming out of retirement.

The New York Daily News reported that Del Rio responded directly to Trump on Twitter, writing, “Take more time being president of the United States and less time trying to shame.”

Lynch has not been a public supporter of Trump. The star running back, earlier in the season, wore a shirt that read, “Everybody vs. Trump,” The Washington Post reported.

The Chronicle reported that Oakland’s mayor and Lynch’s mother have all expressed support for the running back on social media.

Delisa Lynch, his mother, tweeted, “what NFL team do Trump own? oh yeah they wouldn’t let him have one, !! LMAO.”

Edmund DeMarche is a news editor for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @EDeMarche.

Myanmar&#039;s treatment of Rohingya called apartheid

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Amnesty International says Myanmar has subjected Rohingya Muslims to long-term discrimination that amounts to “dehumanizing apartheid,” in an investigative report that raises questions about what those who’ve fled violence would face if they returned home.

Since late August, more than 620,000 Rohingya have fled Myanmar’s Rakhine state into neighboring Bangladesh, seeking safety from what the military described as “clearance operations.” World leaders have said it’s essential for the violence to stop and for Myanmar to allow the refugees to return home safely.

Amnesty International compiled two years’ worth of interviews and evidence in its report Tuesday detailing how Rohingya lived within Myanmar, subjected to a “vicious system of state-sponsored, institutionalized discrimination that amounts to apartheid.”

The rights group said the conditions met the definition of crimes against humanity.

Four top prospects added to Mets&#039; roster

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Teams must add players who signed their first professional contracts at age 18 or younger within five Minor League seasons, or those who signed at 19 or older within four seasons, or they become eligible for other clubs to take in the Rule 5 Draft. Clubs pay $100,000 to make a Rule 5 selection, but if that player doesn’t stay on his new organization’s active roster for the entire next season, he must be offered back to his former club for $50,000.

Bautista, 22, was one of three pitchers the Mets acquired from the Red Sox for Addison Reed on July 31, along with Stephen Nogosek and Jamie Callahan. Appearing in 37 games overall in Class A ball, Bautista went 3-3 with nine saves and a 4.22 ERA. The Mets’ 30th-ranked prospect according to MLBPipeline.com, Bautista struck out 73 batters in 59 2/3 innings.

Mets' Pipeline pitcher of year

Mets’ Pipeline pitcher of year

Corey Oswalt named Mets’ Pipeline pitcher of the year

Check out highlights of Corey Oswalt as he is named the Mets’ Pipeline pitcher of the year

Oswalt, 24, earned Double-A Eastern League Pitcher of the Year honors after going 12-5 with a league-leading 2.28 ERA in 24 starts for Binghamton. He finished second in the Eastern League in victories, third in WHIP (1.18) and fifth in opponents’ batting average (.236), and is MLBPipeline.com’s 27th-ranked Mets prospect.

Bashlor, 24, went 3-2 with 13 saves and a 3.44 ERA in 46 games split between Class A Advanced St. Lucie and Binghamton. He struck out 84 batters in 49 2/3 innings, a rate of 15.2 per nine.

Guillorme, 23, is the highest-ranked prospect the Mets protected, clocking in at 11th on MLBPipeline.com’s list. An Eastern League All-Star and one of the organization’s best defenders, Guillorme hit .283 for Binghamton and was the league’s toughest player to strike out.

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2008. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo and Facebook. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Neurologist due in Philadelphia court on sex charges

0

A neurologist accused of sexual misconduct in three states is due in court on misdemeanor charges that he groped women at a Philadelphia clinic.

Dr. Ricardo Cruciani faces a preliminary hearing in Philadelphia on Tuesday morning. Police have charged him with assaulting seven patients in 2016, while he was chairman of Drexel University’s neurology department.

At least 17 women in Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey have come forward to accuse Cruciani of sexual misconduct in encounters dating back at least a dozen years. The accusers have either reported him to police or have retained attorneys to pursue civil claims.

Cruciani’s lawyer has declined to comment.

Gordon and Vucevic double-double in Magic&#039;s 5th straight loss

0

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — It might have been Victor Oladipo’s best all-around game at the arena where he played his first three NBA seasons.

Oladipo had 29 points, nine rebounds and seven steals to lead the Indiana Pacers to their fourth straight win, 105-97 over the Orlando Magic on Monday night.

The venue and the opponent had very little to do with it, according to the Pacers guard.

More Orlando Magic news

“Honestly, this year every night fuels me,” Oladipo said. “We’ve got to go out and compete in the NBA against the best of the best. That competitive juice, that competitive edge is already running through my veins.”

Oladipo and Bojan Bogdanovic combined for 40 points in the second half, 14 of them during a 16-3 third-quarter run that put the Pacers in command.

Oladipo’s seven steals were a season-high and he also had five assists.

“He’s taking that leader role,” teammate Lance Stephenson said. “He’s bringing it every night and being that guy that we need him to be.”

Bogdanovic scored 24 of his 26 points in the second half, making five of six 3-pointers.

“He was red-hot for us,” said coach Nate McMillan. “Part of the reason we’ve gone to an eight-man rotation is to try to get him minutes at the four position.”

Nikola Vucevic had 25 points and 13 rebounds for the Magic, who lost their fifth straight.

The Magic finished with 22 turnovers and shot 33 percent in the second half to fall below .500 for the first time this season.

After a dunk by Aaron Gordon late in the first quarter, the Magic were down 23-22 despite making nine of their first 12 shots, including four of five 3-pointers. They never regained their shooting touch.

“Somewhere in the third quarter we lost our rhythm, started over-dribbling, got stagnant,” Vucevic said. “I don’t know why because it was working so well for us (in the first half). Then we started forcing stuff.”

Two straight Orlando turnovers helped Indiana take a six-point lead before the Magic closed the first half with 11 straight points for a 55-50 advantage.

Oladipo and Bogdanovic scored 22 points in the third quarter. A 3-pointer by Bogdanovic gave Indiana its first double-digit lead with 4:11 left in the game.

A couple of 3-pointers by Evan Fournier and a 12-foot bank by Gordon pulled the Magic to within three in the final minute, but Oladipo set up Bogdanovic for a 3-pointer that put the Pacers up by six with 16.8 seconds left.

DOWNWARD TREND

The Magic’s five straight losses have been by an average of 16 points.

“We’re trying,” coach Frank Vogel said. “Nobody’s happy with how we’re playing, and we know we’ve got to dig ourselves a little bit out of a rut here.”

TIP-INS

Pacers: After making 11 of 23 attempts at Miami on Sunday, Indiana came into the game as the NBA’s best 3-point shooting team (.404). They made 8 of 20 Monday night.

Magic: Rookie forward Jonathan Isaac missed a fourth straight game with a sprained right ankle. … The Magic outrebounded the Pacers 50-48 after coming into the game with the NBA’s worst rebounding percentage.

UP NEXT

Pacers: After a three-day break, the Pacers will play Toronto Friday night in the first of three straight home games.

Magic: Wednesday night’s game at Minnesota will open a four-game trip.

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US general says nuclear launch order can be refused, sparking debate

0

Just a day after the U.S.’s top nuclear commander said he would resist President Trump’s order if he called for an “illegal” nuclear launch, a fiery debate emerged about the president’s authority to order the firing of a warhead.

Brian McKeon, a senior policy adviser in the Pentagon during the Obama administration, said a president’s first recourse would be to tell the defense secretary to order the reluctant commander to execute the launch order.

“And then, if the commander still resisted,” McKeon said as rubbed his chin, “you either get a new secretary of defense or get a new commander.” The implication is that one way or another, the commander in chief would not be thwarted.

Air Force General John Hyten, commander of the U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), started the debate when he told an audience at the Halifax International Security Forum in Nova Scotia, Canada that he had thought a lot about what to say if he received such an order.

“And if it’s illegal, guess what’s going to happen? I‘m going to say, ‘Mr. President, that’s illegal.’ And guess what he’s going to do? He’s going to say, ‘What would be legal?’ And we’ll come up with options, of a mix of capabilities to respond to whatever the situation is, and that’s the way it works. It’s not that complicated.”

Hyten said running through scenarios of how to react in the event of an illegal order was standard practice, and added: “If you execute an unlawful order, you will go to jail. You could go to jail for the rest of your life.”

It’s hard to overstate how thoroughly the U.S. military has prepared for doomsday — the day America gets into a nuclear shooting war. No detail seems to have been overlooked. There’s even a designated “safe escape” door at the nuclear-warfighting headquarters near Omaha, Nebraska, through which the four-star commander would rush to a getaway plane moments before the first bomb hit.

Procedures are in place for ensuring U.S. nuclear weapons are ready for a presidential launch order in response to — or in anticipation of — a nuclear attack by North Korea or anyone else. There are backup procedures and backups for the backups.

Bruce Blair, a former nuclear missile launch officer and co-founder of the Global Zero group that advocates eliminating nuclear weapons, said the Strategic Command chief might, in effect, be bypassed by the president.

A president can transmit his nuclear attack order directly to a Pentagon war room, Blair said. From there it would go to the men and women who would turn the launch keys.

The renewed attention on these questions reflects unease — justified or not — about Trump’s temperament and whether he would act impulsively in a crisis.

This past week’s Senate hearing was the first in Congress on presidential authority to use nuclear weapons since 1976, when a Democratic congressman from New York, Richard L. Ottinger, pushed for the U.S. to declare it would never initiate a nuclear war. Ottinger said he wanted to “eliminate the prospect that human ignorance and potential human failure in the use of nuclear materials, especially nuclear weapons, will lead to the destruction of civilization.”

Forty-one years later, the U.S. hasn’t ruled out first-strike nuclear options and is unlikely to do so during Trump’s tenure. This troubles experts who worry about a president with the sole — some say unchecked — authority to initiate nuclear war.

The committee chairman, Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., said he was not targeting Trump. But he has publicly questioned whether Trump’s aggressive rhetoric toward North Korea and other countries could lead the U.S. into a world war. In the end, Corker’s hearing produced little impetus for legislation to alter the presidential authorities.

James Acton, co-director of the nuclear policy program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, saw politics at play.

“But I think it’s a genuinely important subject, and I think it’s one we should be debating irrespective of who the president is,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

General&#039;s comments on &#039;illegal&#039; nuclear launch by president sparks debate

0

Just a day after the U.S.’s top nuclear commander said he would resist President Trump’s order if he called for an “illegal” nuclear launch, a fiery debate emerged about the president’s authority to order the firing of a warhead.

Brian McKeon, a senior policy adviser in the Pentagon during the Obama administration, said a president’s first recourse would be to tell the defense secretary to order the reluctant commander to execute the launch order.

“And then, if the commander still resisted,” McKeon said as rubbed his chin, “you either get a new secretary of defense or get a new commander.” The implication is that one way or another, the commander in chief would not be thwarted.

Air Force General John Hyten, commander of the U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), started the debate when he told an audience at the Halifax International Security Forum in Nova Scotia, Canada that he had thought a lot about what to say if he received such an order.

“And if it’s illegal, guess what’s going to happen? I‘m going to say, ‘Mr. President, that’s illegal.’ And guess what he’s going to do? He’s going to say, ‘What would be legal?’ And we’ll come up with options, of a mix of capabilities to respond to whatever the situation is, and that’s the way it works. It’s not that complicated.”

Hyten said running through scenarios of how to react in the event of an illegal order was standard practice, and added: “If you execute an unlawful order, you will go to jail. You could go to jail for the rest of your life.”

It’s hard to overstate how thoroughly the U.S. military has prepared for doomsday — the day America gets into a nuclear shooting war. No detail seems to have been overlooked. There’s even a designated “safe escape” door at the nuclear-warfighting headquarters near Omaha, Nebraska, through which the four-star commander would rush to a getaway plane moments before the first bomb hit.

Procedures are in place for ensuring U.S. nuclear weapons are ready for a presidential launch order in response to — or in anticipation of — a nuclear attack by North Korea or anyone else. There are backup procedures and backups for the backups.

Bruce Blair, a former nuclear missile launch officer and co-founder of the Global Zero group that advocates eliminating nuclear weapons, said the Strategic Command chief might, in effect, be bypassed by the president.

A president can transmit his nuclear attack order directly to a Pentagon war room, Blair said. From there it would go to the men and women who would turn the launch keys.

The renewed attention on these questions reflects unease — justified or not — about Trump’s temperament and whether he would act impulsively in a crisis.

This past week’s Senate hearing was the first in Congress on presidential authority to use nuclear weapons since 1976, when a Democratic congressman from New York, Richard L. Ottinger, pushed for the U.S. to declare it would never initiate a nuclear war. Ottinger said he wanted to “eliminate the prospect that human ignorance and potential human failure in the use of nuclear materials, especially nuclear weapons, will lead to the destruction of civilization.”

Forty-one years later, the U.S. hasn’t ruled out first-strike nuclear options and is unlikely to do so during Trump’s tenure. This troubles experts who worry about a president with the sole — some say unchecked — authority to initiate nuclear war.

The committee chairman, Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., said he was not targeting Trump. But he has publicly questioned whether Trump’s aggressive rhetoric toward North Korea and other countries could lead the U.S. into a world war. In the end, Corker’s hearing produced little impetus for legislation to alter the presidential authorities.

James Acton, co-director of the nuclear policy program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, saw politics at play.

“But I think it’s a genuinely important subject, and I think it’s one we should be debating irrespective of who the president is,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Judge permanently blocks Trump order on sanctuary cities

0

A federal judge in San Francisco has found that President Donald Trump’s executive order barring some federal grant money from being awarded to so-called sanctuary cities is unconstitutional. 

Continue Reading Below

Santa Clara County, Calif., and the city and county of San Francisco sued the administration in February, arguing that the federal government couldn’t block federal funding to cities and other jurisdictions with policies in place to protect immigrants who are in the country illegally. 

In a 28-page ruling, U.S. District Judge William H. Orrick on Monday issued a permanent, nationwide injunction blocking the administration from denying the grant money to jurisdictions the U.S. Justice Departments says aren’t complying with a law that governs communications about immigration status. 

“This is a clear rebuke of the Trump administration’s illegal effort to take away federal funding for critical county health, safety, and emergency services,” said James R. Williams, Santa Clara County counsel. “Today’s decision vindicates a core constitutional principle — that the president cannot use federal funding to threaten local governments.” 

San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera also hailed the ruling in a statement Monday night. 

“Let me be clear. San Francisco follows federal immigration law,” Mr. Herrera said. “The federal government knows who is in our jails. If they think someone is dangerous, all they need is a criminal warrant.” 

Continue Reading Below

A spokesman for the Justice Department didn’t immediately comment on the ruling. 

Several jurisdictions have fought the government’s effort to block grant money based on the information-sharing law. Multiple federal judges had previously issued temporary injunctions blocking the government from carrying out the order. 

Nonetheless, the Trump administration has continued to ramp up its fight over the issue with local jurisdictions around the country. 

Last week the department warned officials in 29 cities, counties and states that they may have violated the terms of the DOJ-administered Byrne Justice Assistance Grant Program for the 2016 budget year. The letters didn’t specify what action the administration could take if the jurisdictions don’t comply, but Trump administration officials have previously said the government could demand repayment of past grant money. 

Officials from several jurisdictions that received the warning letters denied violating the law or rules of the grant program. Santa Clara County officials said the county didn’t receive any grant money in 2016 and suggested the letter was politically motivated. 

–Alejandro Lazo contributed to this article.

Rays Add Seven Players to 40-Man Roster

0

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — In advance oftonightsreserve list deadline, the Tampa Bay Rays have selected seven players to their 40-man roster: right-handed pitchers Brent Honeywell, Diego Castillo, Yonny Chirinos and Jos Mujica, first baseman/outfielder Jake Bauers, outfielder Justin Williams and left-handed pitcher Ryan Yarbrough.Tonightsmoves bring the Rays 40-man roster to 39 players.

Honeywell, 22, went 13-9 with a 3.49 ERA (136.2-IP, 53-ER) in 26 starts between Double-A Montgomery and Triple-A Durham, earning a promotion after two starts at the Double-A level. He led Rays minor leaguers with 172 strikeouts, tied for second in wins and ranked eighth in ERA (min. 100 IP). Among International League pitchers, he ranked second with 152 strikeouts, trailing Yarbrough (159), and tied for third with 12 wins. Following the season, Baseball America tabbed him as having the Best Changeup in the IL in its Best Tools survey. He is ranked byMLB.comas the No. 11 prospect in baseball and the top prospect in the Rays system. Selected by the Rays in the second round of the 2014 June Draft, he is 31-19 with a 2.88 ERA (416-IP, 133-ER) in 79 appearances (78 starts) over four minor league seasons.

Castillo, 23, split the season with Montgomery and Durham, going 4-5 with a 2.76 ERA (71.2-IP, 22-ER) and 15 saves in 51 appearances (one start). He led Rays minor leaguers in saves and was named the organizations Best Relief Pitcher by the Rays Baseball Operations department following the season. He posted a 1.86 ERA (29-IP, 6-ER) in 21 appearances for Montgomery, then ended the season in Durham and went on to record the save in the Governors Cup-clinching win and the Triple-A National Championship Game. He was signed by the Rays as a free agent in March 2014 and is 11-16 with a 2.97 ERA (187.2-IP, 62-ER) in 124 appearances (one start) over four minor league seasons.

Chirinos, 23, went 13-5 with a 2.73 ERA (168.1-IP, 51-ER) in 27 appearances (26 starts) between Montgomery and Durham and was named the organizations Pitcher of the Year by the Rays Baseball Operations department following the season. He ranked second in the organization in ERA (min. 100 IP), tied for second in wins and ranked third with 141 strikeouts. In 23 appearances (22 starts) with Durham, he ranked among International League leaders in ERA (2.74, fourth), wins (12, tied for third), innings pitched (141, fifth) and WHIP (0.98, second). He was signed by the Rays as a free agent in June 2012 and is 36-17 with a 2.75 ERA (474.1-IP, 145-ER) in 98 appearances (70 starts) over five minor league seasons.

Mujica, 21, went 14-8 with a 3.04 ERA (165.2-IP, 56-ER) in 27 starts between Class-A Charlotte and Montgomery, earning a promotion after two starts with the Stone Crabs. He led Rays minor leaguers in wins and ranked fourth in ERA (min. 100 IP). He was selected to the Southern League midseason All-Star Team, and finished the season ranking among SL leaders in wins (13, tied for first), ERA (3.03, sixth), innings pitched (154.1, third), WHIP (1.11, fourth) and opponents batting average (.225, third). He was signed by the Rays as a free agent in July 2012 and is 27-18 with a 3.18 ERA (395.2-IP, 140-ER) in 77 appearances (70 starts) over five minor league seasons.

Bauers, 22, spent the entire season with Durham, batting .263/.368/.412 (128-for-486) with 31 doubles, 13 home runs, 63 RBI and 20 stolen bases in 132 games. He led the International League with 79 runs scored, ranked second with 78 walks and fifth with a .368 on-base percentage. He is ranked byMLB.comas the No. 72 prospect in baseball and the No. 5 prospect in the Rays system. He was acquired by the Rays from the San Diego Padres in a three-team, 11-player trade in December 2014. Over five minor league seasons, he has hit .275/.361/.409 (555-for-2,018) with 115 doubles, 46 home runs, 303 RBI and 45 stolen bases.

Williams, 22, spent the entire regular season with Montgomery, batting .301/.364/.489 (110-for-366) with 21 doubles, 14 home runs and 72 RBI in 96 games. Following the season, he was named Most Valuable Player for Montgomery by the Rays Baseball Operations department, ranking among Southern League leaders in batting average (fourth) and slugging percentage (third). He also finished among Rays organizational leaders in home runs (second) and RBI (third). He was named to the SL postseason All-Star Team, and was promoted to Durham for the teams postseason run. He was acquired by the Rays from the Arizona Diamondbacks in November 2014 and has hit .308/.348/.445 (516-for-1,677) with 99 doubles, 36 home runs and 262 RBI over five minor league seasons.

Yarbrough, 25, went 13-6 with a 3.43 ERA (157.1-IP, 50-ER) in 26 starts for Durham, his first season in the Rays organization. He tied for second in the organization in wins and ranked second with 159 strikeouts to Honeywell (172). He led the International League in strikeouts and also ranked among IL leaders in ERA (eighth), wins (second), innings pitched (third) and games started (tied for first). He was acquired by the Rays from the Seattle Mariners in January 2017 and is 29-19 with a 3.22 ERA (425-IP, 152-ER) in 87 appearances (83 starts) over four minor league seasons.

84 Days Until Pitchers and Catchers Report to Spring Training

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Asian shares advance as Wall Street regains ground

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Asian shares edged mostly higher Tuesday after Wall Street regained lost ground overnight amid subdued trading ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday.

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KEEPING SCORE: Japan’s benchmark Nikkei 225 rose 1 percent to 22,488.38 in morning trading, while the Kospi in South Korea added 0.1 percent to 2,530.64. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng rose 0.9 percent to 29,522.24. Australia’s S&P ASX 200 climbed 0.3 percent to 5,962.00. The Shanghai Composite index surged 0.7 percent to 3,414.57. Southeast Asian shares were mixed.

WALL STREET: U.S. trading has been relatively light ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index picked up 0.1 percent to 2,582.14. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 0.3 percent to 23,430.33. The Nasdaq composite advanced 0.1 percent to 6,790.71. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks climbed 0.7 percent to 1,503.40.

NORTH KOREA: Nervousness about North Korea did little to dampen investor sentiments in Asia, and instead lifted defense-related stock in Japan. President Donald Trump put North Korea on America’s terrorism blacklist, despite questions about Pyongyang’s support for international attacks beyond the assassination of its leader’s half brother in February. IHI Corp. gained 1.3 percent, while Mitsubishi Heavy Industries edged up 0.8 percent.

ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude oil gained 7 cents to $56.49 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It lost 29 cents to $56.49 on Monday. Brent crude oil, the international standard, climbed 11 cents to $62.33 per barrel.

CURRENCIES: The dollar slipped to 112.53 yen from 112.62 late Monday. The euro rose to $1.1739 from $1.1733.

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Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyama

Her work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/yuri%20kageyama