Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Newest royal dog is rescue beagle from Kentucky, report says

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Meghan Markle’s dog, the newest pooch to join the royal family, is reportedly a rescue beagle from the U.S.

Before eventually getting adopted by Markle, the dog, whose name is Guy, arrived at a Kentucky-based high-kill shelter after someone discovered him in the woods, according to CBS News.

But a group called A Dog’s Dream Rescue reportedly saved the then-three-year-old pup and brought him to Canada where he’d ultimately be adopted by the future Duchess of Sussex.

MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY MAKE FIRST OFFICIAL APPEARANCE AS NEWLYWEDS

According to the group’s Facebook page, A Dog’s Dream Rescue is an organization based in Ontario that saves Beagles “mostly from Kentucky and Ohio that are on the list to be euthanized because no one wants them.”

In a post from November 2017, the group shared photos on their social media page of the pup.

Along with the post was a message which read: “Well it’s official!!! Spring of 2018 will mark the date that one of our rescued Beagles will become part of the ROYAL FAMILY!!!”

MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY RELEASE OFFICIAL ROYAL WEDDING PHOTOS

They said Guy had been rescued by the organization and adopted by Markle “a few years ago – the same Meghan Markle that is now engaged to Prince Harry!!”

The pup also accompanied his owner to their new home in the United Kingdom, the communications secretary for Prince Harry told The Guardian in November.

North Korea threatens to back away from summit with US, reportedly calls Pence 'political dummy'

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North Korea early Thursday threatened to back away from the much-anticipated upcoming summit with the U.S. and called Vice President Mike Pence a “political dummy,” ratcheting up the rhetoric after months of signaling an openness to compromise.

The dig at Pence apparently stemmed from his Fox News interview on Monday, when he told Martha MacCallum on “The Story,” that North Korea “asked for the meeting” with the U.S.

“As a person involved in the U.S. affairs, I cannot suppress my surprise at such ignorant and stupid remarks gushing out from the mouth of the U.S. vice president,” North Korea’s vice foreign minister, Choe Sun Hui, said in a statement released by state media, according to The Wall Street Journal.

She added that whether the U.S. and North Korea “will meet us at a meeting room or encounter us at nuclear-to-nuclear showdown is entirely dependent upon the decision and behavior of the United States,” South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency reported. 

Choe reportedly said she’d suggest to Kim reconsidering the summit in the event “the U.S. offends against our goodwill and clings to unlawful and outrageous acts.”

The threat came after Trump met with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the White House.

Trump said Tuesday “there’s a very substantial chance” his meeting with Kim won’t happen as planned, telling reporters that Kim had not met unspecified “conditions” for the summit. 

On Wednesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he was “very hopeful” the summit would proceed, but said that whether the meeting takes place is “ultimately up to Chairman Kim.”

If the summit between the U.S. and North Korea happens, it will be the first between leaders of the two countries during more than six decades of hostility.

The North unexpectedly pulled out of planned peace talks with South Korea last week, objecting to U.S.-South Korean military exercises, and also threatened to abandon the planned Trump-Kim meeting, accusing the U.S. of a “one-sided demand” that it give up its nuclear weapons.

“Whatever it is,” Trump said, “we will know next week about Singapore and if we go I think it will be a great thing for North Korea.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.

Angelina Jolie's custody battle with Brad Pitt means their kids can't leave the country

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The dragged-out divorce talks between Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt have hit yet another snag — since Jolie wants to take their six kids with her to London to film the blockbuster sequel “Maleficent 2.”

Hollywood sources familiar with the film tell Page Six that Jolie is furious since she wants to bring the couple’s brood with her while the film shoots, at the same time their custody battle continues to brew since their 2016 split.

“They are figuring out how it would work, but she is not happy,” said a source. The source explained, “She wants to take the kids to London with her while she’s shooting — and she’s frustrated with the process. They’re talking about how it would work.”

A source said that Jolie’s been so miffed by the situation, “Even the people around her are getting tired of it.”

The celebrity couple is privately still hammering out their split, including custody of their kids, Maddox, Pax, Zahara, Shiloh and twins Vivienne and Knox.

Page Six reported in February that talks were cordial, but they are still ongoing.

At the same time, Jolie’s next project, “Maleficent 2” — the sequel to the 2014 original that made $759 million — is gearing up. The production on Wednesday cast British “Interstellar” actor David Gyasi to join the film that also reportedly stars Elle Fanning, Michelle Pfeiffer and Chiwetel Ejiofor. Reps did not comment.

Meanwhile on Wednesday, Pitt’s ex-fiancée Gwyneth Paltrow recalled to Howard Stern how Pitt years ago warned Hollywood troll Harvey Weinstein to stay away from her.

“We were at the opening of ‘Hamlet’ on Broadway, and Harvey was there,” said Paltrow, who’s since publicly alleged she was sexually harassed by Weinstein.

She said Pitt “told me exactly what he said” to Weinstein.

“He said, ‘If you ever make her feel uncomfortable again, I’ll kill you.’ ” She told Stern the move was “like the equivalent of throwing him against the wall, energetically . . . he leveraged his fame and power to protect me at a time when I didn’t have fame or power yet.”

This article originally appeared in Page Six.

Trump orders Commerce Department to examine tariffs on auto imports

The Trump administration is looking into using national-security laws to impose new tariffs on vehicle imports, according to administration officials and industry executives briefed on the plan.

President Donald Trump is asking for new tariffs of as much as 25 percent on automobile imports, according to those familiar with his request, after he repeatedly signaled his intention to impose such tariffs.

Mr. Trump has asked his team to investigate using a legal provision of the 1962 Trade Expansion Act to find whether tariffs or other restrictions are needed on imported cars. It is the same legal justification the administration used to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports in March.

In a Twitter message on Wednesday, he said, “There will be big news coming soon for our great American Autoworkers. After many decades of losing your jobs to other countries, you have waited long enough!”

The move opens yet another front in the Trump administration’s trade battles with both allies and rivals, a confrontational approach that has yielded mixed results. The administration is locked in touchy negotiations over narrowing China’s $375 billion annual trade surplus with the U.S. So far, Beijing has refused to commit to much more than stepping up purchases of U.S.-produced commodities.

Click for more from The Wall Street Journal.

Stormy Daniels honored in West Hollywood with key to city

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Adult-film actress Stormy Daniels, who is entrenched in a lawsuit with President Trump, received the key to the city of West Hollywood on Wednesday as officials honored her for her legal strife.

Daniels made an appearance at Chi Chi La Rue’s as the city declared the day “Stormy Daniels Day,” according to KABC-TV.

“The community of West Hollywood was founded more than three decades ago on the principal that everyone should be treated with dignity and fairness and decency,” Daniels said at the event, according to the TV station. “And this community has a history of standing up to bullies and speaking truth to power. And I’m so very lucky to be a part of it.”

Earlier, the city released a statement saying, “In these politically tumultuous times, Daniels has proven herself to be a profile in courage by speaking truth to power even under threats to her safety and extreme intimidation.”

Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, is suing Trump and his attorney, Michael Cohen, in federal court in Los Angeles over a non-disclosure agreement and a $130,000 payment she received to keep quiet about it.

“(The) Trump administration has been a direct threat to the people of the city of West Hollywood – our LGBTQ community, our immigrant community, women here in this community – so Stormy Daniels has really showed up as the woman to save the Republic,” West Hollywood Mayor John Duran said prior to the event.

Ryan Gaydos is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @RyanGaydos.

Syria state-run media reports US-led airstrike on army posts

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A Syrian government-run media outlet reports that U.S.-led coalition airstrikes have struck Syrian army positions in eastern Syria near the front lines with the Islamic State group.

'Arrested Development' cast talked Jeffrey Tambor, revealed on-set fight with Jessica Walters

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With “Arrested Development” about to drop on Netflix, the cast sat down for a free wheeling interview where they were asked about the misconduct allegations against cast member Jeffrey Tambor, leading to a reveal about abuse between he and his on-screen wife.

The cast members sat down for an interview in which they were asked about the allegations against Tambor that came out about his conduct on the set of “Transparent.” As previously reported, three people connected to the production of the Emmy-winning accused Tambor of sexual misconduct and harassment. He has since been removed from the show as it continues on without him.

The 73-year-old has denied the allegations and was allowed to participate in “Arrested Development” Season 5, which wrapped filming right around the time that it wrapped filming. In an interview with The New York Times, the cast was asked about the allegations against Tambor, prompting costar Jason Bateman to defend his on-screen father. The star declared that he would not be a part of another season of the fan-beloved series in the event Tambor wasn’t asked to participate. 

Tambor was then asked about a quote he gave to The Hollywood Reporter in which he revealed that he had an on-set argument with his “Arrested” on-screen wife, Jessica Walters.

“Which we’ve all done, by the way,” Bateman interjected.

“You’ve never yelled at me,” Walters responded. “You have never yelled at me like that.” 

“ Let me just say one thing that I just realized in this conversation,” Walters said through tears. “I have to let go of being angry at him. He never crossed the line on our show, with any, you know, sexual whatever. Verbally, yes, he harassed me, but he did apologize. I have to let it go. [Turns to Tambor.] And I have to give you a chance to, you know, for us to be friends again.”

Although Bateman continued to explain Tambor’s behavior as par-for-the-course in showbusiness, Walters noted that in her 60 years of working, she’d never had anybody yell at her the way Tambor did. 

Tony Hale chimed in to agree with Bateman that this kind of stuff happens, but Walters wasn’t having it.

“But not like that, not like that,” she said. “That was bad.” 

She went on to note that Tambor has since apologized and that she’s willing to work with him again largely because he was willing to admit his wrongdoing and commit to change. Sadly for curious fans, the duo did not elaborate on what happened in the alleged blowout or what it was reportedly over. However, as Us Weekly notes, many fans who read the interview were quick to side with her over the rest of her on-screen family. 

North Korea threatens to cancel summit if US won't stop 'unlawful and outrageous acts,' South Korean media report

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North Korea has reportedly threatened to back away from the upcoming summit between Kim Jong Un and President Trump if the U.S. doesn’t stop committing “unlawful and outrageous acts.”

“Whether the will meet us at a meeting room or encounter us at nuclear-to-nuclear showdown is entirely dependent upon the decision and behavior of the United States,” the nation’s vice foreign minister, Choe Son-hui, said of the June 12 summit in Singapore, according to South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency.

Choe reportedly said she’d suggest to Kim reconsidering the summit in the event “the U.S. offends against our goodwill and clings to unlawful and outrageous acts.”

The threat came after Trump met with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the White House.

Trump said Tuesday “there’s a very substantial chance” his meeting with Kim won’t happen as planned, telling reporters that Kim had not met unspecified “conditions” for the summit. 

On Wednesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he was “very hopeful” the summit would proceed, but said that whether the meeting takes place is “ultimately up to Chairman Kim.”

If the summit between the U.S. and North Korea happens, it will be the first between leaders of the two countries during more than six decades of hostility.

The North unexpectedly pulled out of planned peace talks with South Korea last week, objecting to U.S.-South Korean military exercises, and also threatened to abandon the planned Trump-Kim meeting, accusing the U.S. of a “one-sided demand” that it give up its nuclear weapons.

“Whatever it is,” Trump said, “we will know next week about Singapore and if we go I think it will be a great thing for North Korea.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.

Stylist: Man with Vegas gunman's name talked concert attack

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A hairstylist said a client with the same last name as the Las Vegas shooter spoke in the months before the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history about a concert venue being susceptible to attack, according to documents released by police Wednesday.

Las Vegas police released about 2,100 pages of police reports, witness statements and dispatch records after losing court battles to keep them secret. Witness names were blacked out, so their accounts could not be verified, and police and FBI officials said they would not comment on the newly released information.

The documents did not immediately yield answers to the key unanswered question more than seven months after the Oct. 1 attack that is still under investigation: a motive.

They recount tales of horror and heroism, chaos and confusion. They detail how officers responded to the massacre, initially believing the Las Vegas Strip faced large-scale attack by multiple shooters and struggling to direct panicked people to safety and help save victims who were bleeding, begging for help and getting trampled.

Authorities have not determined what led Stephen Paddock to open fire from his high-rise hotel room onto an outdoor concert below, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds more. Police and the FBI said they believe he acted alone and the attack had no link to international terrorism.

The hairstylist told investigators on Oct. 10 that a client named Paddock mentioned during a haircut in June or July that someone could shoot into a crowd at the outdoor concert venue from the casino across the way.

A woman later arrived, and the stylist believed it was Paddock’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley.

“I asked her, ‘Do you know what he’s been saying to me?'” the stylist told police. “She’s like, ‘Oh, what, about somebody shooting into a crowd and, you know, wanting to hurt a lot of people?'”

The stylist told police that the client said, “I wonder what she’s worried about? She’ll be out of the country.”

Danley was in the Philippines during the shooting. Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo, elected head of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, said earlier this year that he did not expect criminal charges against Danley. She had been called the only person of interest in the case.

The stylist reported feeling uneasy and calling police about the comments but couldn’t say when and wasn’t positive of doing so. Police say in the interview that there’s no record of a call.

The documents also detailed gripping tales, including one from an officer who heard rapid gunfire on his radio and arrived to find hundreds of people running at him, many of them wounded and screaming.

Other officers said they crouched behind patrol vehicles, unable to determine where gunfire was coming from while a rear window shattered and bullets hit the ground around them. A rookie officer, Brady Cook, was wounded in the arm. Detective Casey Clarkson was struck in the neck.

Other officers, shielded by a block wall, reached concertgoers. An officer described trying to help a woman with blood gushing from a gunshot to her eye while a man held her head, asking for help.

Gunfire began again, the officer said, “and I heard impacts hitting in front of me. At this point, everyone started screaming and I told everyone to move.”

Police tried to help people despite being unclear where the gunfire was coming from and facing reports of multiple shooters.

The officer met with a rushing crowd said he responded to calls about active shooters at the New York-New York casino-hotel, the Tropicana across from the concert venue, and the Paris Las Vegas. No shooters were found.

Vehicles carrying bleeding and injured people sped away from the shooting scene, flashing lights and honking horns. Authorities set up makeshift triage areas, where one officer “tried to keep the victims focused on staying alive” while figuring out some kind of evacuation plan.

Another officer told a group of between 100 and 150 bystanders to take off any belts and T-shirts that could be used as tourniquets.

An off-duty officer attending the country music festival said he tried to get his fiancee and a friend to safety, lying over them multiple times as panicked people rushed to escape.

“As I was lying on top of them people were trampling over top of us trying to escape the area,” wrote the officer, identified only as M. Amburgey.

Authorities say Paddock, 64, a real estate investor and high-stakes gambler, had amassed an arsenal of nearly two dozen assault-style rifles and numerous high-capacity ammunition magazines.

The documents also raised more questions about when police reached the shooter’s room and why they waited more than an hour to enter it.

“When we got off on the 32nd floor, we heard active shooting still going on,” a Mandalay Bay hotel employee who said he accompanied a Las Vegas police officer.

Authorities have said that gunfire stopped before police reached the 32nd floor, and that Paddock killed before officers reached his door.

Police said they have compiled thousands of documents and amassed hundreds of hours of video, including witness cellphone recordings and footage from officers’ body-worn cameras.

The department has been releasing the information in waves after a court order in a lawsuit by The Associated Press and other media organizations.

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Contributing to this report were Associated Press journalists Michelle L. Price in Las Vegas; Scott Sonner in Reno, Nevada; Courtney Bonnell in Phoenix; Brian Eason in Denver; Amanda Lee Myers in Los Angeles; Martha Bellisle in Seattle; Lindsay Whitehurst in Salt Lake City; Terry Tang, Jacques Billeaud and Anita Snow in Phoenix; Mary Hudetz in Albuquerque, New Mexico; Becky Bohrer in Juneau, Alaska; Felicia Fonseca in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Video shows road rage suspect hitting man with sledgehammer

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A road rage suspect seen on surveillance video hitting a man with a sledgehammer after smashing the windows out of a vehicle is being sought by Philadelphia police.

Sarah Paulson defends relationship with Holland Taylor, 75, slams critics calling couple's 32-year age gap 'strange'

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Sarah Paulson, 43, doesn’t care if people judge her relationship with actress Holland Taylor, 75 — after all, the “Oceans 8” star says, the pair are in love.

Paulson opened up about her 2-year relationship with Holland in Modern Luxury’s June cover story, confirming the couple is still going strong, despite receiving harsh criticism over their 32-year age gap.

“If anyone wants to spend any time thinking I’m strange for loving the most spectacular person on the planet, then that’s their problem,” she told Modern Luxury, according to People. “I’m doing just fine.”

The pair met during a dinner party more than a decade ago when Paulson was dating actress Cherry Jones, who is 18 years older. Paulson recalled thinking Holland was “the most exquisitely beautiful woman [she’d] ever seen,” she told The New York Times.

Years later, the women found themselves back in a room together. 

“If anyone wants to spend any time thinking I’m strange for loving the most spectacular person on the planet, then that’s their problem.”

– Sarah Paulson

Actress Martha Plimpton asked the stars to film a short video for A Is For, a nonprofit that advocates for women’s reproductive rights. Afterward, they followed each other on Twitter, eventually arranging a date via direct message.

“There’s a poignancy to being with someone older,” Paulson told the newspaper. “I think there’s a greater appreciation of time and what you have together and what’s important, and it can make the little things seem very small.”

Paulson went public about her romance with Holland in March 2016, though many cautioned against it.

“It occurred to me, should I not do that? And then I thought, why would I not?” Paulson told The EDIT in a December 2017 interview. “The fact I’m having this thought is wrong. But I had a moment of societal concern; wondering if, maybe, people who didn’t know that about me would be like, ‘Wait, what?’ But then, you know, I did it anyway.”

In the June Modern Luxury issue, the Emmy award-winning actress also spoke about her upcoming blockbuster “Ocean’s 8,” which will be released on June 8. Paulson, who plays a suburban mom named Tammy in the film, said her character looks nothing like her — and she loves it.

“The more I can look in the mirror and not recognize myself, the more excited I am,” she told the magazine, according to People. “We’re constantly faced with all these idea of beauty … things that Hollywood puts out there for us to gobble up. It’s very powerful when I look in the mirror and the first thing I’m thinking isn’t, ‘Are you pretty?'”

Man arrested at McDonald's for threatening customers with stun gun, yelling 'get out of my country'

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A Florida man was arrested for allegedly threatening and assaulting a group of men eating at McDonald’s Wednesday morning.

The St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office were called to the Florida McDonald’s around 2:20 am Wednesday morning over reports that John Smith, 60, was telling a group of men “get out of my country, you don’t deserve to eat here,” and trying to shock one with a stun gun.

WOMAN SHOCKS 64-YEAR-OLD MAN WITH STUN GUN AT MCDONALD’S, POLICE SAY

When deputies arrived, Smith reportedly told them, “I am American and the guys by the vehicles were making [a] ruckus so I told them to get out of here and one of them pulled a gun and they left in a red vehicle,” Fox 30 reported.

According to the police report, the men Smith was yelling at told authorities they were eating in the parking lot when Smith confronted them, yelling “get the [expletive] out of here, you don’t deserve American food,” Fox 30 reported.

The men said they tried to leave in their car, but Smith pulled out a stun gun and placed it inside their car window. One of the victims said they had to move their face to avoid getting shocked, according to Fox 30.

Smith admitted to the police that he had a “zapper” in his pocket, Fox 30 reported. Smith smelled of alcohol and was slurring his words, deputies said.

The victim was able to back up his car during the attempted assault, but hit a pole and damaged his vehicle.

The McDonald’s manager confirmed to police that they saw Smith approach the victim’s vehicle and reach inside with the stun gun.

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Smith was evaluated by medics for shortness of breath before being placed in the police car. In the car, deputies said in the report they heard Smith say, “They killed my son.” Smith continued to say his “son died in Afghanistan while in combat with the Marine Corps,” Fox 30 reported.

Smith was charged with aggravated assault, burglary and trespassing.

Alexandra Deabler is a Lifestyle writer and editor for Fox News.

Train plows into truck stuck on tracks in Italy; 1 dead

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Authorities in northern Italy say a train plowed into a big-rig truck that was on the tracks, killing the train’s engineer and injuring 16 passengers.

The Italian news agency ANSA quotes rescuers as saying early Thursday that one passenger was critically injured while the other 15 were in less serious condition. RAI state radio says another train crew member was among the injured.

The crash occurred about 11:20 p.m. Wednesday on a regional run between Turin and Ivrea, a suburb. The regional railway says that for unknown reasons the truck had smashed through a barrier that is lowered upon a train’s approach and ended up on the tracks. The crash derailed three train cars near the town of Caluso.

Rescuers searched the wreckage in case any passengers were trapped.

Police: Officer's gun goes off, striking man in burning home

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Police say an officer’s gun discharged during an altercation, striking a man who had refused to leave a burning house in Maryland.

Baltimore County police spokesman Cpl. Shawn Vinson says two officers had entered the Dundalk house on Wednesday and found a man and woman inside. The woman escaped, but the man refused to leave.

Vinson says the officer’s gun somehow discharged at one point, striking the man in the torso. The officer suffered from smoke inhalation, and WBAL-TV reports they were both taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Vinson says one officer was wearing a body camera and that police will check footage as they seek to determine why the gun fired.

Gwyneth Paltrow says Brad Pitt confronted Harvey Weinstein after 'petrifying' hotel encounter in 1995

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Actress and Goop founder Gwyneth Paltrow said Wednesday that Brad Pitt confronted film producer Harvey Weinstein after he allegedly sexually harassed her during the early days of her career.

Paltrow opened up about the experience on Howard Stern’s radio show Wednesday.

“We had one instance in a hotel room where he made a pass at me,” Paltrow told Stern. “It was out of the blue and I’ll tell you, I had been having the most incredible experience at Miramax.”

The actress said she was completely “blindsided.”

Shortly after the alleged encounter, Paltrow said she told Pitt about the experience (the two dated and were briefly engaged in the 1990s). Pitt later confronted Weinstein at the 1995 opening of the Broadway version of “Hamlet,” she claimed, describing it as “the equivalent of throwing him against the wall.”

Pitt allegedly told Weinstein, “‘If you ever make her feel uncomfortable again, I’ll kill you.’ Or something like that,” Paltrow recalled.

“It was so fantastic because what he did was, he leveraged his fame and power to protect me at a time when I didn’t have fame or power yet,” she told Stern.

While Weinstein never sexually harassed her again, the actress said her professional relationship with the film producer, who has been accused of sexual misconduct by more than 60 women, “was pretty fraught at times” in the aftermath.

Paltrow first told The New York Times in October 2017 that Weinstein allegedly asked her to give him a massage. The incident occured around the same time Weinstein hired the now 45-year-old to play Emma Woodhouse in the film “Emma,” Weinstein’s 1996 adaptation of the Jane Austen classic.

“I was a kid, I was signed up, I was petrified,” Paltrow, who was 22-years-old at the time, told The New York Times.

The 66-year-old has denied allegations of non-consensual sex, according to People. However, Weinstein did issue a lengthy apology following The New York Times report.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.

Rain from Gulf floods Southeast; tropical storm possible

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Heavy rains from the Gulf of Mexico spawned flooding in the Southeastern states Wednesday ahead of what could become the year’s first tropical storm, just as tourist season begins.

The National Hurricane Center said a disturbance still over water in the western Caribbean had a 70 percent chance of becoming a subtropical or tropical system by Memorial Day, and rain is forecast to continue even if it doesn’t.

The system will be named “Alberto” if it strengthens into the first tropical storm of the 2018 hurricane season, which doesn’t begin until June 1. Forecasters said rain would become more widespread and heavier as the area moves northward toward land.

In southeastern Alabama, downpours already covered roads and bridges in Lee County. Emergency management officials said at least two bridges collapsed and multiple roads were barricaded because of high water. Photos shared on social media showed washed-out roads, and schools opened late because of heavy rains.

Darlene Speck said she had to drive about 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) out of the way to get to work at Terry’s Get & Go, a convenience store in Smiths Station, Alabama, because of a barricade blocking a flooded road.

“We’ve got a creek that’s flooding not even a quarter mile from where our store is,” said Speck.

As much as 7 inches (18 centimeters) of rain is possible in south Florida, where some areas had more than 14 inches (35 centimeters) of rain last weekend. Similar rain totals are possible from southeastern Louisiana to central Georgia, with the coasts of Alabama and the western Florida Panhandle in a bull’s-eye to receive the most rain.

Memorial Day is the traditional beginning of beach season, but the weather service issued warnings about dangerous currents along the Gulf Coast during the holiday period. People uncertain about the weather already are making other plans because of the forecast.

“We actually have had several cancellations today,” said Liz Wood, who works at the beachfront Buccaneer Inn on St. George Island, Florida. “It always gets like this when there’s uncertainly over when (a storm) is going.”

Ike Williams, who owns a company that rents beach chairs, umbrellas and other gear in Gulf Shores, Alabama, said workers were stowing away some items because of forecast.

“This is probably the earliest storm that I can ever remember in the history of the business that has ever threatened this early. That’s 38 years,” said Williams, of Ike’s Beach Service.

Grand jury says police shooting of Georgia man justified

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Police were justified in fatally shooting a 20-year-old man, a grand jury said Wednesday, after concluding that he pointed a BB pistol at officers who had come to arrest him.

Savannah police had a warrant to arrest Ricky Boyd on a felony murder charge when they shot him outside his house on Jan. 23. His family insists he was unarmed. The Georgia Bureau of Investigation said he was holding a BB pistol that appeared to be a real gun.

Chatham County District Attorney Meg Heap presented the GBI’s findings to a civil grand jury over three days beginning Monday, asking the panel to decide if the evidence supported pursuing criminal charges against any of the officers.

“I’m very sorry for the family, but the evidence appears to show the actions of the officers were justified,” Heap said in an interview. “They believed he was firing on other officers.”

The grand jury issued its nine-page report Wednesday, saying eight Savannah police officers and deputy U.S. marshals were justified in believing they were in danger of being shot after Boyd emerged from his home and refused orders to raise his hands.

“A short time later, he quickly removed his hands from his pocket area holding a BB gun and assumed a shooter’s two-handed stance while pointing the BB gun in the directions” of officers, the report said.

One officer’s body camera captured the shooting. The grand jury said it shows Boyd with an object in his hands, but isn’t clear enough to identify the object as a gun. “It is not possible to accurately determine what happened by viewing the video at regular speed; repeated slow motion and still frame viewing is necessary,” its report said.

Boyd’s mother, Jameillah Smiley, and other family members declined to testify before the grand jury. Smiley told reporters she didn’t trust the district attorney, and believes authorities and prosecutors have been “covering up” for the officers who shot her son.

The Boyd family’s lawyers have questioned whether he really held the BB pistol, saying a neighbor’s photo showed it more than 40 feet from where he was shot. The grand jury said officers were afraid to render first aid to Boyd with the gun next to him, so an officer picked it up, carried it across the yard and dropped it next to a tree, where it was collected for evidence.

Smiley said investigators let her view the video, and she said it shows her son with his arms raised and no weapon in his hands.

“We are saddened but not surprised by today’s decision,” her attorney, Will Claiborne, said in a statement Wednesday evening. He planned a news conference Thursday.

Claiborne has urged federal authorities to investigate Boyd’s shooting as a violation of his civil rights. Heap said the Justice Department has told her it plans to look at the case. She said she welcomes “a second set of eyes.”

The grand jury report says civilian witnesses also reported seeing Boyd raise a gun at officers, and that one of Boyd’s family members told the GBI that she “heard him fire his gun first; that Ricky Boyd’s gun fire sounded like a BB gun and not like a real gun; the police did not fire at Ricky Boyd until after Ricky Boyd fired the first shot.”

Another unnamed relative, however, told the GBI that Boyd was simply holding his hands together as if he had a gun.

One Savannah officer was wounded. Investigators determined he was hit by bullets fired by a marshal that ricocheted off Boyd’s house, the report said.

The grand jury said officers had come to Boyd’s home to arrest him on a felony murder charge in the slaying of a 24-year-old man two days earlier. Evidence in that case showed Boyd and two others set out to rob Balil Whitfield during a marijuana deal on Jan. 21, the grand jury said. Its report said Boyd and an unnamed family member of his were in the back seat of Whitfield’s car when the relative shot Whitfield multiple times in the back and face. The report said Boyd dropped his cellphone fleeing the scene.

Boyd’s mother later told police in a recorded statement that Boyd “had admitted to his father his participation in Balil Whitfield’s murder,” the grand jury said. It reported that Boyd’s father has not cooperated with police.

Elon Musk rants against media on Twitter, proposes website to rate journalists

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk aired his frustration with the media on Wednesday, issuing a series of tweets calling out the “hypocrisy of big media companies” before floating the idea of starting a website which would allow the public to rate journalists.

“The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to sugarcoat the lie, is why the public no longer respects them,” Musk started out by tweeting

Musk went on to claim that “journos are under constant pressure to get max clicks & earn advertising dollars or get fired.”

“Tricky situation, as Tesla doesn’t advertise, but fossil fuel companies & gas/diesel car companies are among world’s biggest advertisers,” he said.

ELON MUSK CONFIRMS TESLA MODEL 3 HAS A BRAKING ISSUE, SAYS A FIX IS IN THE WORKS

And to one Twitter user who commented on the CEO’s remarks, Musk replied “the media has earned this mistrust. But maybe there is a solution.”

Musk also talked about creating a site, possibly called Pravda, where people “can rate the core truth of any article” and keep track of the credibility of a journalist or news outlet. He also created a poll, asking followers to choose whether the website was a good idea.

Pravda was the name of a Communist newspaper in the former Soviet Union.

Musk’s company has been the recipient of recent backlash due to a number of crashes involving the company’s vehicles.

TESLA THAT CRASHED INTO TRUCK WAS ON AUTOPILOT, DRIVER SAYS

During one incident in Utah this month, the driver of a Tesla that crashed into a truck at 60 mph told police that she had the vehicle’s autopilot feature turned on.

Musk reacted at the time, tweeting that it was “super messed up that a Tesla crash resulting in a broken ankle is front page news and the ~40,000 people who died in US auto accidents alone in past year get almost no coverage.”

During Wednesday’s comments, Musk also responded to individual reporters, including one who retweeted Musk’s comment and drew a comparison to President Trump.

In response to a reporter who said Musk was continuing “his slow transformation into a media-baiting Trump figure screaming irrationally about fake news,” the Tesla CEO replied, “Thought you’d say that. Anytime anyone criticizes the media, the media shrieks “You’re just like Trump!

ELON MUSK SHOWS OFF INCREDIBLE SPACEX HUMAN TRANSPORT POD ON INSTAGRAM, TWITTER

“Why do you think he got elected in the first place?” Musk continued. “Because no one believes you any more. You lost your credibility a long time ago.”

To another journalist, who wrote that “blaming the messenger is the hot new thing everyone’s doing,” Musk replied, “Oh hey another sanctimonious media person who thinks he’s above criticism.”

“Try being truthful & the public will believe you again,” Musk said.

Tesla did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Fox News’ Nicole Darrah contributed to this report.

Rep. Steve Scalise: I am open to a special prosecutor

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This is a rush transcript from “Your World,” May 23, 2018. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DONALD TRUMP, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: I want them all to get together, and I want them, because everybody wants this solved. But a lot of bad things have happened. We now call it spygate. You’re calling it spygate.

A lot of bad things have happened. I want them all to get together. They will sit in a room. Hopefully, they will be able to work it out among themselves.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

NEIL CAVUTO, HOST: Well, actually, the president is calling it spygate.

So, since he has done that, others have sort of taken up the baton just to sort of simplify this story. What it is about is these revelations now that the FBI, Justice Department had spies, you know, people seeking information from an in embedded in the Trump campaign back in 2016.

At first, we thought the fall of 2016. At first, we thought one individual. Now it’s back to the spring of 2016 and maybe several individuals, that, of course, coming from Michael Caputo, a former operative for Donald Trump who was with me on this show just last night.

Let’s get read on all of this and so much more, including tax cuts and all of that, with House Majority Whip Steve Scalise.

Congressman, always good to have you. Thank you for coming.

REP. STEVE SCALISE, R-LA, HOUSE MAJORITY WHIP: Always great to be back with you.

CAVUTO: What do you make of this? The president says, we got to got to the bottom of this. Some are calling for a special prosecutor to look into this. What is your view on it?

SCALISE: Look, I have had a lot of concerns for a while about some of the things that have been going on at the FBI.

And I have been vocal about it, saying the FBI needs to get their house in order and not focus on witch-hunts, but actually keep true to their core mission of keeping America safe. And we have raised a lot of questions through our oversight hearings, Devin Nunes and his committee, some of the things Trey Gowdy has been looking into to, where we’re trying to get more facts from Justice, from FBI, and frankly not getting all the information that we need.

And we’re going to keep pressing to get that — those answers.

CAVUTO: It sounds like you wouldn’t be keen on a separate prosecutor. But would that mean an inspector general, again, making this an added thing to look into, or Hollywood?

SCALISE: Well, look, I’m open to a special prosecutor to look into some of these other allegations that I don’t think are being adequately addressed.

CAVUTO: OK.

SCALISE: One way or another, however we can quickly get them addressed.

If the FBI and Justice just turn over the documents that have been requested without redacting almost full pages in a ridiculous way, then I think we would make a lot of headway and answer a lot of questions. They should be as interested as we are in rooting out any bad actors over at FBI.

If they’re bad actors, they should want them out, just like we would.

CAVUTO: All right, do you find it odd, sir, though that they’re — if this indeed was going on and they had operatives kind of spying or looking around the Trump campaign, and they never bounced it off the Trump campaign to give them the heads-up that’s what they were doing, what do you think of that?

SCALISE: Well, I think it all sounds very odd.

I don’t know what all of the facts are yet because we haven’t gotten all the facts. Best thing that they can do is give us all the information. And if something bad happened, they should want to root it out just like us. They shouldn’t want to cover anything up. They shouldn’t want to hide it.

Don’t redact all these documents that we’re asking for. There’s an Article 1 and Article 2 of the Constitution authority. We have an oversight responsibility for the American people.

CAVUTO: Could I ask you something a little bit about the speaker’s position? He’s going to retire after his term ends. But some of your colleagues want him out now.

And I’m just wondering what do you think of that.

SCALISE: I haven’t heard that hue and cry.

What I know we’re focused on is pursuing our agenda, continuing to move the economy forward. We’re seeing great economic numbers. But there’s a lot more we can do. We have even talked about some things like a tax reform 2.0, working with President Trump to build on the success we already had.

Let’s stay focused on doing our job. The midterm elections are coming. And we’re going to deal with that too. We’re going to make sure that Nancy Pelosi is not speaker.

CAVUTO: So you’re not for switching speakers out or choosing on a leader of your party in the House until after the election?

SCALISE: Right.

I’m focused on moving our agenda forward. Paul Ryan is as well. So is Kevin McCarthy. Our team has got a lot of work to do. And we’re working with the president, in Donald Trump, who wants to get really good things done and is already seeing a lot of good things done on taxes, on regulatory reform.

Let’s keep adding more jobs. Let’s keep building our economy. And then we will let the November elections deal with themselves.

CAVUTO: All right, so, Congressman, if some of your colleagues — now, actually, there are a good many of them at last count — come up to you and say, Steve, you know, we need you right now, and we respect Paul Ryan, but January is a long time, we could get some things done right now with a new energized, galvanized group led by you, you would say?

SCALISE: That’s not what people are talking about right now.

They’re saying, let’s get a farm bill done that puts work requirements in place so that somebody that is on welfare today, when people are looking for jobs, can actually get into the work force. That’s what we’re going to be doing in these next few weeks. Let’s actually make tax cuts permanent that are working really well for families, but will expire in the next eight years.

Let’s get them permanent. Let’s have that vote soon in these next few months. Those are the kinds of things we’re dealing with.

(CROSSTALK)

CAVUTO: I’m sorry, sir.

The individual tax cuts, you’re talking about, make them permanent, and those then expire in ’25.

SCALISE: Individual and small business. Yes.

CAVUTO: All right, as you know, a number of Democrats, led by Nancy Pelosi, but there are a host of others, say they want to scrap the plan that you guys came up, that it’s not fair, not right, not balanced.

You say?

(LAUGHTER)

SCALISE: I say, they have no idea what is going on out there is how excited middle-class and hardworking families are to see more money in their pockets, to see companies hiring and companies giving more bonuses and pay raises to their workers.

When Nancy Pelosi says she wants to raise taxes in the face of lower taxes getting our economy going again, it shows the contrast and what is at stake in this November’s election.

I want to have that debate. Let’s have that vote on the House floor and say I know there’s — some of the rates are going to expire in 2024. Let’s make those tax cuts permanent. And if she wants to keep voting no, she said she wants to be speaker, she said she wants to raise taxes, let the American people decide that issue in November.

CAVUTO: I would like to hear your thoughts on the president, besides just worrying about ironing out the differences that apparently have cropped up between himself and the North Koreans ahead of that big meeting, talk about getting a trade deal with the Chinese, which would include potentially some rescue of ZTE, the Chinese telecommunications concern, of course, that’s been found guilty of espionage.

It’s been sanctioned. It’s been punished. A lot of your Republican colleagues in both the House and the Senate think it’s very dangerous what the president is doing. What do you think?

SCALISE: Well, I think the fact that the president is engaging other countries is important for America.

Look at what he’s doing with Mexico and Canada in renegotiating NAFTA. There are a lot of important issues on the table that can benefit America’s economy. I encourage him to continue doing that and going and getting a better deal for America.

If he can engage the Chinese and get them to stop their bad practices that they’re engaging in, that’s a good thing. Obviously, there’s some areas that we want to see addressed. And the president wants to see a lot of those things addressed, too.

This president has been standing up for America, rebuilding our military. Look at what he’s done just recently in pushing to give the largest pay raise to our troops in years.

(CROSSTALK)

CAVUTO: But he’s still talking to ZTE or this is an issue of helping ZTE.

Now, the president says nothing has been decided on that.

SCALISE: Right.

CAVUTO: But a lot of your colleagues are worried enough, sir, to say, don’t even think about it, and this — this could require our intervening to stop you from doing it.

SCALISE: Well, the first thing to do is to engage with the administration.

President Trump has shown a real willingness to work with Congress to iron these problems out. And that’s the way to handle it. Talk to him, just like on trade. Everybody was saying there was going to be a big trade war. And there’s not, because President Trump worked with us, worked with other people to make sure we keep seeing this economic growth while tracking down on cheaters like China in some of the areas where they have been hurting our economy.

So, I think he’s been proven that he’s got a great track record in negotiating and working with us to make sure that we’re addressing problems and getting our economy growing.

And there’s a lot more growth we can have. Why stop now?

CAVUTO: All right, very good seeing you again, Congressman Steve Scalise, House majority whip. Be well.

SCALISE: Always great to be with you, Neil.

CAVUTO: Same here. Thank you, sir. All right.

END

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Milwaukee police apologize for Bucks guard Sterling Brown's arrest as video released

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Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales apologized Wednesday for how his department handled the January arrest of Bucks guard Sterling Brown — including the officers’ use of a stun gun.

Morales says officers “acted inappropriately,” and that those officers recently had been disciplined.

He says he’s “sorry this incident escalated to this level.”

“When I took office, I vowed to rebuild trust between the Milwaukee Police Department and the community,” he told reporters. “We are doing that.”

Morales’ statement came as the department released body-camera footage of the arrest.

Brown was arrested around 2 a.m. Jan. 26 in a Walgreens parking lot by officers who used a stun gun. Officers had been checking on a vehicle parked across two handicap spaces. Brown was not charged.

“The common denominator in all of these situations has been racism towards the minority community, the abuse of power, and the lack of accountability for officers involved. The lack of repercussions for the police officers involved in so many of these cases is offensive. This is a slap in the face to the victims’ families and communities,” Brown said in a statement posted to Twitter Wednesday afternoon. “Black men shouldn’t have to have their guard up and instantly be on the defensive when seeing a police officer, but it’s our reality and a real problem. There must be mutual respect and both sides have to figure out how to accomplish this.”

City officials who had viewed the videos had expressed concern about how officers conducted themselves. Even leaders of the police department hinted the video may make them look bad.

Police previously had shown the body-camera footage to some local officials, including a closed session of a Common Council committee.

The Bucks signed the 6-foot-6 guard from SMU last summer in a deal with the Philadelphia 76ers.

His arrest and the video of it represent another potential setback for a department that for years has tried to rebuild its image and relationship with Milwaukee’s African-American residents after several high-profile cases of police misconduct.

Last year, Milwaukee paid $2.3 million to settle a lawsuit over the death of Dontre Hamilton, a mentally ill black man fatally shot by a police officer after the officer roused him from a park bench downtown. The officer said he shot Hamilton 14 times in self-defense because they got into a struggle when the officer frisked him for weapons.

In 2016, the city paid $5 million to settle a lawsuit by 74 black residents who said police illegally strip-searched them between 2008 and 2012. Currently, the city is considering settling a lawsuit by the American Civil Liberties Union in Wisconsin, which is representing eight residents who say police targeted them for stops because they were African-American or Latino and because of the high-crime areas where they lived.

In early May, police and prosecutors began investigating four officers who were involved in the violent arrest of a black man in a majority African-American neighborhood. Video from a bystander showed a group of officers kicking and punching the man on the ground while he was restrained. Police presented their body-camera footage of the encounter, which showed the man aggressively charging at officers and trying to punch them.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Arby's creates Brandi Chastain portrait out of sauce as response to bad plaque

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Arby’s is getting saucy in Brandi Chastain’s honor.

American soccer star Brandi Chastain was inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame Monday night with a plaque that some of Twitter called “an embarrassment.”

ARBY’S CUSTOMER HELPS STATE TROOPER FIGHT OFF ATTACKER

As a response to the plaque, which Chastain herself called “not the most flattering,” Arby’s has offered its own version of the athlete – to rave reviews.

“Hey @brandichastain, it’s not made of gold, but we think you look much better in Arby’s Sauce,” the fast food chain wrote on Twitter.

Those on social media responded to the likeness done on wax paper, saying it was a “better rendition” of Chastain than the commemorative plaque.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

Though Arby’s may be fans of the soccer celeb, it’s more likely that the fast food chain was trying to advertise its newest Arby’s Sauce condiment. The brand even released a downloadable Arby’s Sauce font for those who want to “say it with sauce” instead of draw it.

Alexandra Deabler is a Lifestyle writer and editor for Fox News.

The Latest: Official: Lava wall protecting geothermal plant

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The Latest on the eruption of a volcano in Hawaii (all times local):

1:15 p.m.

Officials say lava spatter from Hawaii’s erupting volcano is creating a wall that’s helping protect a nearby geothermal plant.

U.S. Geological Survey scientist Wendy Stovall said Wednesday that lava erupting from a vent closest to Puna Geothermal Venture is shooting higher than lava coming out of other vents.

She says it’s also producing the highest lava wall, which is blocking molten rock from flowing north toward the plant.

Residents have been concerned about hazards if lava flowed over the plant’s facilities or if the molten rock heated chemicals at the plant.

Lava from the eruption on the Big Island is primarily flowing south toward the ocean.

Officials shut down Puna Geothermal shortly after Kilauea began erupting on May 3.

On Tuesday, officials finished plugging wells that bring up hot liquid and steam that feed a turbine generator.

___

10:30 a.m.

Blue flames from burning methane have become part of the eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii.

Nighttime photos released Wednesday by the U.S. Geological Survey show the flames spouting from road cracks in the Leilani Estates neighborhood where the volcano has been sending up lava through vents in the ground.

The volcano produces methane when hot lava buries and burns plants and trees.

Scientists say the methane can seep through cracks several feet away from the lava. The methane can also explode when heated.

Kilauea began erupting lava in a residential neighborhood on May 3. It has since opened more than 20 vents releasing lava, sulfur dioxide and steam.

The eruption has destroyed 50 buildings, including about two dozen homes. One person was seriously injured after being hit by a flying piece of lava.

___

8 p.m. Tuesday

Authorities say production wells at a geothermal plant under threat by lava flowing from Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano have been plugged to prevent toxic gases from seeping out.

Ten wells were “quenched,” which cools them with cold water, and the last was plugged with mud. A metal cap has been added on top as an additional measure.

Puna Geothermal, owned by Nevada’s Ormat Technologies, was shut down shortly after Kilauea began spewing lava on May 3. The plant harnesses heat and steam from the earth’s core to spin turbines to generate power.

A flammable gas called pentane is used as part of the process, though officials earlier this month removed 50,000 gallons (190,000 liters) of the gas from the plant to reduce the chance of explosions.

Bucks guard Sterling Brown's statement on Milwaukee arrest

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Text of a statement from Milwaukee Bucks guard Sterling Brown about his January arrest by Milwaukee police during an interaction over a parking violation:

My experience in January with the Milwaukee Police Department was wrong and shouldn’t happen to anybody. What should have been a simple parking ticket turned into an attempt at police intimidation, followed by the unlawful use of physical force, including being handcuffed and tased, and then unlawfully booked. This experience with the Milwaukee Police Department has forced me to stand up and tell my story so that I can help prevent these injustices from happening in the future.

Situations like mine and worse happen every day in the black community. Being a voice and a face for people who won’t be heard and don’t have the same platform as I have is a responsibility I take seriously. I am speaking for Dontre Hamilton of Milwaukee, Laquan McDonald of Chicago, Stephon Clark of Sacramento, Eric Garner of New York, and the list goes on. These people aren’t able to speak anymore because of unjust actions by those who are supposed to “serve and protect” the people.

The common denominator in all of these situations has been racism towards the minority community, the abuse of power, and the lack of accountability for officers involved. The lack of repercussions for the police officers involved in so many of these cases is offensive. This is a slap in the face to the victims’ families and communities.

Black men shouldn’t have to have their guard up and instantly be on the defensive when seeing a police officer, but it’s our reality and a real problem. There must be mutual respect and both sides have to figure out how to accomplish this.

There are no easy solutions to this problem, but there are strides that can be made to create change. I will do my part in helping to prevent similar incidents from happening to the minority community in the future.

This is bigger than me. My family, friends, legal team, Priority Sports, Milwaukee Bucks, the black community and the communities of all who stand against injustice plan to continue the fight. Peaceful support to ensure no further damage to our community is the only way to respond. I know many of you will share my anger and frustration, but for our community to progress and grow, we need to build on what we already have and not destroy it. I will take legal action against the Milwaukee Police Department to continue forcing change in our community.

More than $8M awarded to victim of cult in trafficking case

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More than $8 million was awarded Wednesday to a woman who alleged that the spiritual leader of a cult forced her to work without pay for a decade.

U.S. District Judge Daniel Crabtree of Kansas wrote in the order that Royall Jenkins and his organization, The Value Creators, exploited Kendra Ross’ vulnerability, “knowing that she was unfamiliar with the world outside the cult, had received no standard education, was constantly moved from place to place, and had no money.” Ross alleged in the lawsuit that from the age of 11 until 2012, when she “gathered her courage and strength to escape,” she was forced to work without pay in restaurants and as a maid, cook and childcare provider in Kansas City, Kansas; Atlanta; Dayton, Ohio; Newark, New Jersey; and New York City.

Crabtree said Jenkins and his group, formerly known as the United Nation of Islam, controlled Ross’ romantic relationships, imposed strict discipline and that she became “severely malnourished” because of the treatment she received. Crabtree said Ross was led to “believe that if she did not continue to work for them, she would suffer serious harm.” She has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, according to her lawsuit.

No attorney is listed for Jenkins, and he doesn’t have a listed phone number. Jenkins was a member of the Nation of Islam until 1978 when he formed the separate United Nation of Islam after he said that “angels and/or scientists” abducted him and escorted him through the galaxy on a spaceship and instructed him on how to govern earth. He established a small community of followers and business in economically depressed areas. The group, which taught that black males were superior to women and men of other races, changed its name to The Value Creators after Ross escaped.

Ross’ attorney, Betsy Hutson, said her client, whose location is being kept confidential, is “thrilled” and described the judgment as a “powerful tool for the anti-trafficking movement.” Hutson said that there were “no chains but an immense amount of psychological damage.” Hutson said the “next big challenge” is to collect on the settlement but adds there is reason to believe that the group has “significant properties.”

“This has been a really long process,” Hutson said. “It is a result of a lot of years of hard work. We see that she has made incredible progress, coming out of this cult and facing her perpetrators.”

'Bachelorette' Becca Kufrin: 5 fast facts about the Minnesota reality star

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Have you met “The Bachelorette” Becca Kufrin?

The 28-year-old publicist from Minnesota will look for love among 28 suitors in the ABC reality love competition. Season 14 kicks off on Monday at 8 p.m. ET. 

Ahead of Kufrin’s televised “journey,” read on for some quick facts about her.

No stranger to Bachelor Nation

“The Bachelor” Arie Luyendyk Jr. popped the question to Kufrin, who was a contestant on his season. However, the romance was short-lived.

“In a change of heart, Arie broke up with America’s sweetheart just weeks after proposing to her – stealing her fairytale ending and her future,” ABC explained in a biography on Kufrin on its website.

Luyendyk broke off his engagement to Kufrin to be with 25-year-old Virginia native Lauren Burham, who was initially the runner-up. Luyendyk and Kufrin had been engaged for two months.

‘Bidenisbae’

Kufrin wore a “Biden my time” shirt in a February 2017 Instagram post.

“Just over here like 👆🏼,” she captioned the snap. “#bidenmytime#2020#haveyouseenhimeatanicecreamconetho#bidenisbae.”

Kufrin also used the hashtag “#imwithher,” referring to then presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton, in a Nov. 8, 2016 post on the social media platform. 

Stamps are one of her must-haves 

Kufrin was asked about five items she “can’t live without” in her “Bachelor” contestant questionnaire

“Chapstick, facial lotion, bobby pins, popcorn, and stamps,” she shared. 

She also listed some “embarrassing” listening choices. 

“Country (when I’m feeling sad) or the Sister Act 2 soundtrack, which I don’t think is embarrassing at all, but my friends disagree,” Kufrin said. 

Breaking the law? 

Perez Hilton reports that “in 2009, the reality TV starlet was busted for ‘underage consumption.’ Kufrin pled guilty to the misdemeanor and was ordered to pay at least $431 in fines.”

She’s engaged

Kufrin shared the good news with People.

“It was the happiest moment of my life, she told the publication. “And it feels so good to say it. I still pinch myself, like, did that all just happen? It’s been a whirlwind.”

“The Bachelor” host Chris Harrison spoke about the engagement in a recent Instagram post.

“I can tell you today that Becca is indeed happily engaged! I can’t tell you who it is but here’s a hint… It’s a human man,” he wrote.

Fox News’ Katherine Lam contributed to this report.