Heat Advisory in Effect for Wednesday

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HEAT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM TO 8 PM EDT WEDNESDAY…

It’s time for the Delaware State Fair, which begins on Thursday – that means the hottest weather of the summer is upon us! Starting Wednesday morning, New Castle County will be under an excessive heat watch through Sunday night, with temperatures in the low to high 90s, and heat index values getting as high as 110 Friday through Sunday. Kent and Sussex counties are under a heat advisory – temperatures and heat index values will be dangerously high there as well, with Saturday’s high expected to hit 100 in Georgetown. Tips for you and your family:

• If you can, limit your time in the sun.
• Dress in loose-fitting and light clothes.
• Take frequent water breaks and drink more water than you typically do.
• Exercise inside or if choose outside, either go early in the morning or later in the evening.
• Never leave children or pets in parked cars because a car’s interior can reach lethal temperatures in a matter of minutes.
• Check in on your neighbors, especially seniors and people with disabilities.
• Run your dishwasher, washer, dryer or other appliances at off-peak times to reduce demand on the electrical grid.

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The National Weather Service in Mount Holly has issued a Heat Advisory, which is in effect from 11 AM to 8 PM EDT Wednesday.

  • HEAT INDEX VALUES…Up to 109 due to temperatures in the mid 90s, and dewpoints in the mid 70s.
  • TIMING…The highest heat index values will occur mid day, though there won’t be much relief during the overnight hours. Excessive heat will also be possible starting again Friday though the weekend.
  • IMPACTS…The heat and humidity may cause heat stress during outdoor exertion or extended exposure.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS… A Heat Advisory means that a period of hot temperatures is expected. The combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will combine to create a situation in which heat illnesses are possible. Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors.

Take extra precautions, if you work or spend time outside. When possible, reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Wear light weight and loose fitting clothing when possible and drink plenty of water.

To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location. Heat stroke is an emergency, call 9 1 1.

• If you can, limit your time in the sun.
• Dress in loose-fitting and light clothes.
• Take frequent water breaks and drink more water than you typically do.
• Exercise inside or if choose outside, either go early in the morning or later in the evening.
• Never leave children or pets in parked cars because a car’s interior can reach lethal temperatures in a matter of minutes.
• Check in on your neighbors, especially seniors and people with disabilities.
• Run your dishwasher, washer, dryer or other appliances at off-peak times to reduce demand on the electrical grid.